BELVEDERE TR-223 (SHARP)

This classy Belvedere TR-223 was made in Japan by Sharp circa 1959. It appears to be relatively rare. It features a beautiful gold and white reverse-painted face and red cabinet. The Belvedere badge on the front of the speaker grill is written in vivacious red script emphasizing this radios class. This is one smoking hot radio!

It uses the same plastic case as a number of other radios made by Sharp most notably the Seminole TR-221, Airline 1131, Continental TR-182 and Sharp TR-222. It measures just 112mm L x 64mm H.

On the 23rd of April 2010 I received the following email from Jeff March regarding memories of his Belvedere TR-223.

I owned a Belvedere TR-223 that my parents gave to me for my birthday in 1959. Mine looked exactly like that, and seeing it again brought a lump to my throat and a big smile. I discarded mine many years ago. I prized that radio when it was new, and I took good care of it, always keeping it in its leather case. I remember the case had two snaps on the back to open it.

It had a goofy little earphone that kept falling out of my ear because it was just a little too wide for my ear canal, and it had a tinny speaker, but it introduced me to radio stations KFWB and KRLA in Los Angeles, where I grew up, and to rock and roll music.

Your preservation of these vintage radios is commendable. I appreciate what you've done.

 

 
 
  

MORE...

Sharp was founded in 1912 by Tokuji Hayakawa as a small metalwork shop in the center of Tokyo. The first product that they manufactured was a patented belt buckle! In April 1925 Sharp produced Japan's first working radio in the form of a crystal set! In 1928 Sharp began selling tube radios. In 1942, the company reverted to its original name of Hayakawa Electric Industry Co Ltd but still continued to sell products branded as Sharp. In 1959 after further expansion Sharp began to manufacture and offer a full range of consumer electronics.

 

 
 
 
   
 

INSIDE...

This Belvedere TR-223 uses six ‘TEN’ brand (Kobe Kogyo) transistors to pull in local stations. It also uses a 'TEN' diode, a Sharp speaker and some other Sharp brand components.